Ex-Walmart CEO: American Consumers Are at Breaking Point

SHARE
TWEET
Ex-Walmart CEO: American Consumers Are at Breaking Point

Former Walmart CEO Bill Simon has warned that American consumers are reaching a breaking point and are on the verge of folding as inflation keeps rising.

Simon told CNBC that a perfect storm of high interest rates and inflation is undermining consumers and their spending propensity.

“That sort of pileup wears on the consumer and makes them wary,” Mr. Simon told the outlet. “For the first time in a long time, there’s a reason for the consumer to pause.”

Consumer spending is a major factor in driving the US economy, accounting for roughly two-thirds of gross domestic product (GDP).

Simon said after a long period of cheap money cut short by the Federal Reserve’s rapid rate hikes, consumers are about to buckle.

“Consumers had an incredible 10-, 12-year run,” he told CNBC’s “Fast Money” program. “Markets were buoyant. Interest rates were low. Money was available.”

As The Epoch Times reported:

Faced with soaring inflation that remained persistently high despite predictions that the price spike would be short-lived, Fed officials have pushed the benchmark federal funds rate quickly from near zero in March 2022 to its current range of 5.25–5.5 percent.

The government released the latest data on inflation on Thursday, showing that the Consumer Price Index (CPI) rose 3.7 percent in September, matching August’s pace.

While that’s down from a recent peak of 9.1 percent in June 2022 and lower than the 8.2 percent pace a year ago, it’s still well above the Fed’s inflation target of 2 percent.

Even though a number of Fed officials have, in recent days, suggested that the rate-hiking cycle may have reached its peak, newly released minutes detailing internal discussions during the Fed’s latest rate-setting policy meeting in September show most of them think one more rate increase is in store—followed by a period of higher interest rates for “some time.”

The higher-for-longer interest rate environment means tighter financial conditions, marked by more expensive borrowing and reduced lending, putting a damper on economic activity. It also tends to mean less consumer spending.

Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst at Bankrate, told The Epoch Times in an emailed statement that even though inflation has fallen from its recent peak, it’s still well above many consumers’ comfort level.

“For consumers trying to manage their personal finances amid inflation, the situation with prices is a bit like battling illness. Being past the worst of it isn’t the same as feeling better or robust,” he said.

Many economists see a relatively high probability of a recession in the coming year, with signals like waning consumer confidence an often-cited canary in the coal mine.

With persistently high inflation and a deteriorating economic outlook, September saw consumer confidence fall for the second consecutive month to hit a four-month low, according to the Conference Board.

Also, expectations about the economic outlook over the next six months dropped below the Conference Board’s recession threshold of 80, reflecting waning confidence about business conditions, job availability, and earnings.
“Write-in responses showed that consumers continued to be preoccupied with rising prices in general, and for groceries and gasoline in particular. Consumers also expressed concerns about the political situation and higher interest rates,” Dana Peterson, chief economist at the Conference Board, said in a statement.

All that consumer worry is likely to translate into reduced spending if it hasn’t already. The latest consumer spending data is for August, and it shows personal consumption expenditures (PCE) growing 0.4 percent that month, less than half of July’s pace of 0.9 percent.

A recent survey carried out in September by CNBC-Morning Consult found that 92 percent of US adults have cut back on spending over the past six months.

Looking forward, over three-quarters of those polled said they plan to cut back on spending for non-essential items.

Further, a recent survey of consumer expectations from the New York Federal Reserve shows that more US households report being financially worse off now than they were a year ago.
Forty-one percent of households say they’re financially worse off than a year ago, up from 40 percent in August.

Unsurprisingly, given the Fed’s series of aggressive rate hikes and speculation that more could be in store, households’ perceptions of and expectations for credit conditions deteriorated.

The survey also gauged consumer spending intentions one year ahead. While these remained unchanged in September at 5.3 percent, they generally fell steadily from a peak of 9.0 percent in May 2022.

A number of large retailers, such as Target, have reported a drop in discretionary spending.

“There is some real concern about weakness in the consumer,” Sarah Hunt, a partner at Alpine Saxon Woods, told Bloomberg TV in an interview at the end of September.

“There’s a real spending issue coming up and I think that’s going to impact earnings.”

READ: AOC Tries to Get Biden off the Hook by Claiming Inflation Is Just ‘Propaganda’

NOTICE: Our comment section is currently disabled due to malicious attacks preventing our readers being able to comment properly. We are in the process are implementing a new system which will be live soon! Sorry for any inconvenience!

SHARE
TWEET
Telegram
Email
Reddit
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments

Breaking

Trending

Reports Emerge of Drivers Becoming 'Sick' While Driving Electric Vehicles
Reports Emerge of Drivers Becoming 'Sick' While Driving Electric Vehicles
Electric vehicle drivers and their passengers are falling sick according to experts, who say the lack...
'The View' Hosts Implode as They Realize Alvin Bragg's Trial Is Helping Trump
'The View' Hosts Implode as They Realize Alvin Bragg's Trial Is Helping Trump - WATCH
ABC’s “The View” co-hosts have only just begun to realize the Manhattan DA Alvin Bragg‘s...
Teacher Fired after Refusing to Use Preferred Pronouns Wins $360,000 Settlement
Teacher Fired after Refusing to Use Preferred Pronouns Wins $360,000 Settlement
A former high school teacher who was terminated for refusing to use students’ preferred pronouns...
Don Lemon Reveals Grim News as He Hit Rock Botton in Major Career Failure
Don Lemon Reveals Grim News as He Hits Rock Botton in Major Career Failure
Former CNN, anchor Don Lemon, is facing more setbacks after Elon Musk cut short his doomed venture into...
Rapper, 17, Accidentally Shoots Himself in the Head While Filming TikTok Video
Rapper, 17, Accidentally Shoots Himself in the Head While Filming TikTok Video
A teenage rapper from Virginia has fatally shot himself as he played with a gun while filming a TikTok...
Son of New Zealand MP Dies Suddenly at 22
Son of New Zealand MP Dies Suddenly at 22
ACT MP Mark Cameron announced the death of his Son Brody, 22, after he died unexpectedly, sparking an...
Pelosi Warns Against Biden Debating Trump as Handler Issue 'List of Demands'
Pelosi Warns Against Biden Debating Trump as Handlers Issue 'List of Demands'
Former House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said she would not recommend that Joe Biden debate President Donald...
Rumble Sues Google for over $1 Billion for Ad Monopoly Abuse
Rumble Sues Google for over $1 Billion for Ad Monopoly Abuse
Search giant Google is facing a $1 billion lawsuit from Rumble for illegally leveraging its technological...
18 States Sue Biden Admin for New Gender Identity Rules for Employers
18 States Sue Biden Admin for New Gender Identity Rules for Employers
Tennessee Attorney General Jonathan Skrmetti led a coalition of 18 states in filing a lawsuit against...
148 House Democrats Vote against Deporting Migrants Who Assault Police
148 House Democrats Vote against Deporting Migrants Who Assault Police
A new bill aimed at deporting illegal immigrants out of the United States if they assault a police officer...
0
What are your thoughts? Click to commentx
()
x

JOIN THE FIGHT!

SIGN UP FOR OUR FREE BREAKING NEWSLETTER STRAIGHT TO YOUR INBOX! 

We don’t spam! Read our Privacy Policy for more info.